Delaware Court of Chancery

In the recent decision of Blackmon v. O3 Insight, Inc., C.A. No. 2020-1014-SG (Del. Ch. Mar. 9, 2021), the Delaware Court of Chancery held that the arbitrability of a Delaware director’s claim for advancement must be determined by an arbitrator.

The Petitioner, Theodore Blackmon, is a director and stockholder of respondent O3 Insight, Inc.

Delaware stockholders and directors have an important tool in their arsenal to obtain information from a Delaware corporation: Section 220 of the Delaware General Corporation Law (“DGCL”). The statute confers standing upon stockholders or directors to demand inspection of the books and records of a Delaware corporation.  Del. C. § 220. This post will

In the recent opinion of Stream TV Networks, Inc. v. SeeCubic, Inc., C.A. No. 2020-0310-JTL (Del. Ch. Dec. 8, 2020) (Laster, V.C.), Vice Chancellor Laster invoked over a century-long development of Delaware corporate jurisprudence to support his ruling that the assets of a 3D television technology company can be transferred to secured creditors, notwithstanding

Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 30(b)(6) now includes a confer-in-good-faith requirement.  The amendment addresses perceived deficiencies in the Rule 30(b)(6) process, including inadequately prepared witnesses and deficient notices. To address these challenges, the rule makers concluded that requiring lawyers to address such issues in advance will increase clarity and resolution.

The new amendment provides as